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You could be turning deaf because of your headphones. Our expert lists a guide of what you should avoid while listening to your favourite tracks on the go
Is music your safe haven from the hellish traffic jams you travel through everyday? You might need to re-think this strategy. Drowning out incessant honking on our potholeridden roads with Comfortably Numb, might just be numbing your eardrums for life. Like Rajeev Khandelwal who loses his hearing in Soundtrack, thanks to his constant use of headphones as a DJ; the actor’s on-screen nightmare can actually become your reality.
In today’s world of iPods and phones that can play music, most people are plugged in constantly. Our expert Dr Nishit Shah, ENT consultant at Bombay Hospital tells you what you can do to avoid losing your sense of sound.
Play it loud
Listening to music at half the volume your player is

obviously not damaging. It all depends on the volume and how long you are listening to it. Shah says, “There are guidelines laid down by World Health Organization as to what decibels are permissible. Most workplaces and music player manufacturers adhere to these guidelines. But constant exposure is still a problem.” Cranking up

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the volume for longer periods of time is very dangerous, and can lead to partial deafness. The higher the volume gets the lesser amount of time the ear can take it.
Uncomfortably numb

Unlike people who go deaf during a bomb blast or hearing the sonic boom of a plane, deafness caused by headphones creeps on you and if not checked, the effects can be adverse. “I have seen people who show no obvious signs of deafness when they are young, can hardly hear anything when they reach their 60s.” Studies show that this is common among people who go for a lot of concerts and

clubs. Shah says, “Deafness caused due to listening to music does not happen overnight. The ear warns you before things can get really bad with tinnitus.

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